Appeal to Help Sudanese Refugees in Ethiopia

Hundreds of thousands of people are fleeing from the violence that has caused so much death and suffering in South Sudan in the last two months. Media reports have put the death toll from the violence at 1,000, while other reports estimate the number dead to be closer to 10,000.

Refugees are flooding across the border into Gambella, a region in the west of Ethiopia (see map below). There are 70 Anglican Churches in the Gambella Region, and some of these churches are very close to the South Sudanese border.Gambella mapUrgent Needs
Bishop Grant LeMarquand, the Area Bishop for the Episcopal Area of the Horn of Africa, writes:

“Some of the towns where we have churches near the border have been overrun with large numbers of people fleeing the fighting in South Sudan. In the village I visited last weekend, there are now 4,000 refugees from the Nasir area of South Sudan and it is expected that more will arrive. The UN is preparing a camp, which should take about a month to prepare. Although the refugees were at first sleeping and cooking in church compounds (pictured below), they have now been integrated temporarily into the community, sleeping and cooking in the compounds of the local people.

Church compound

The refugees will receive food rations once they have been moved to the camp. In the meantime they have been surviving on the generosity of local people, especially the churches, and cutting and selling firewood. I brought 800 kilograms of maize, tarps for shelter from the intense sun, mosquito nets, soap, sugar and salt to the village to the Anglican church in the village. The pastor of church is also the chairman of the village Nuer Council of Churches, which will arrange for the supplies to be distributed.

In the coming weeks I will meet with pastors of our congregations in refugee camps to assess what new needs they have because of the situation in South Sudan. There has been an influx of new people in all of the camps, and it will take some effort on the part of relief agencies and the churches in the camps to assist in the settlement and integration of these newcomers.”

 

Samaritan Fund
The Episcopal Area has a ‘Samaritan Fund’ which enables the Anglican Church to respond quickly to help our congregations and new refugees. This fund was less than empty when this last crisis hit, as there has been a few desperate needs in the past year. This has included a localised famine in the village of Tiergol, devastating fires which burned several houses of clergy and church members in Gambella town, and surgery for a young girl shot during a cattle raid.

We are seeking support of partners to donate to the Samaritan Fund, enabling the Anglican churches in Gambella to respond to the needs around them.

 

How to Contribute
In  the  UK,  please  contact  The  Egypt  Diocesan  Association  (EDA)  through  Mr. Joseph Wasef (edasecretary@gmail.com) or visit their website: http://www.eda-egypt.org.uk/

In the USA, you can either contact The Friends of the Anglican Diocese of Egypt (FADE) through Dr.  Randi  Wood (blessfade@gmail.com) or  visit their  website: www.friendsanglicandioceseegypt.org

or

Give through our partner the Anglican Relief and Development Fund in the USA: http://anglicanaid.net/south-sudan-refugee-crisis/

To contribute directly to Ethiopia, please contact Bishop Grant LeMarquand (bishopgrant777@gmail.com) or the bank account details are:

Account Name: The Anglican Church in Ethiopia
Account Number: 476/0130422129700
Bank Name: Awash International Bank s.c.
Branch: Arat Kilo
Swift code: AWINETAA
Address: P.O Box 12638

 

Advent Appeal for Churches in Gambella

Giving in Gambella

There is a little church in a town called Ilea in Gambella. The church’s walls are made of a few bamboo sticks; its roof a UNHCR tarp. There is nothing inside but a bare, smooth floor of packed mud. Bishop Grant LeMarquand recently taught at the church about the woman who had given Jesus her wealth (her gift of costly ointment worth a year’s wages); had given her pride (in the ancient world only a slave could be required to attend to a person’s feet); and she had given her reputation (she had let down her hair to wash Jesus’ feet). As it came time for this church to give the offering, to the handfuls of grain and little one birr notes (worth six cents) that were laid on the mat, were added the gifts of the women. One laid down her head scarf, the next her necklace of plastic beads, and one by one, women, who from a western perspective had ‘nothing’, came and brought their gifts – ‘costly’, because that was all they had.

About Gambella

Each week over 6,000 people worship in 70 congregations in Gambella, a region in the west of Ethiopia. These congregations are active in Mothers’ Union, Bible studies, youth ministry, literacy classes, prayer meetings and community development and serve both nationals and refugees from neighbouring Sudan who worship in a variety of languages including Anuak, Dinka, Nuer, Mabaan and Opo.

Make a difference - make a donation today

The Road to Sustainability

Under the leadership of the Right Revd Dr Grant LeMarquand, the Area Bishop for the Horn of Africa, the churches are growing rapidly.  And although people give sacrificially, it is not enough to cover the salary of the priests who are active in discipleship, evangelism and planting new churches.

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The challenge now is to support these clergy prayerfully and financially. With the long-term goal of establishing self-supporting churches, the congregations are expected to pay increasing percentages of the priests’ salaries each year. In the short term, however, our congregations are not able to cover the full amount of these salaries. We need you to consider partnering with these churches on their journey to become self-supporting.

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Partner with Us

Please pray for the churches in Gambella, and consider supporting the salary of one or more of these priests as a one time donation or an ongoing relationship.

  • Cost of a priest: $2,200 per year
  • Church contribution: $200 per year
  • Balance needed: $2,000 per year

Just click on the buttons below to download printable PDFs and a PowerPoint Presentation that you can share with others.

How to Contribute

You can contribute directly into the bank account of the Anglican Church in Ethiopia

Bank name: Awash International Bank S.C.
Branch: Awat Kilo Branch
Bank address: PO Box 12638 Addis Ababa
Account name: The Anglican Church in Ethiopia
Account number: 476-01304221297000
SWIFT code: AWINETAA

If you are in the USA, you can make a tax deductible donation through the Friends of the Anglican Diocese of Egypt, a registered 501(c)3 corporation.

www.friendsanglicandioceseegypt.org

If you are in the UK, you can contribute through the Egypt Diocesan Association, a registered UK charity, and if you are a UK taxpayer you can “Gift Aid It” – adding 25% to your gift.

www.eda-egypt.org.uk

For more information about our work in Gambella and elsewhere in the Horn of Africa, just click HERE.
Advent Appeal for Gambella (Arabic)
Advent Appeal for Gambella (English)
Advent Appeal for Gambella (Powerpoint)

Archbishop John Sentamu: “The Deaf School is a real sign that the Anglican Church cares for people no-one else cares about”

Archbishop John Sentamu with the Deaf

The Anglican Church in Egypt has an active ministry among the Deaf community including the Deaf Unit (a boarding school for 80 deaf children), the Vocational Training Centre, the Church for the Deaf, and a project to translate the Bible in Egyptian sign language.

When Archbishop John Sentamu, the Archbishop of York, last visited Egypt in 2010, he promised the deaf community based in Old Cairo that he would help to raise support for a new building for their Deaf Club. He said “When I visited Cairo, it was a great delight to meet the children and workers at the school’s Deaf Club.  I was deeply moved to see how much the Deaf Unit was making to people who couldn’t afford services to help them. The work of the Unit is growing and helping many more children and parents”

Archbishop John Sentamu returned to Cairo in early November 2013 for the 75th Celebrations of All Saints Cathedral. The Deaf who attended were so happy to see them, and in his address Archbishop John mentioned “the deaf school is a real sign that the Anglican Church cares for people who no-else cares for.”

For more information about the Arcbishop’s Appeal for this project, please see the following link: Archbishop’s Appeal for Deaf School

For more information about the Deaf Unit, please see their website: www.deafunit.org

 

Help us to Help Others

Dear brothers and sisters,

Greetings in the Name of our Lord Jesus Christ!

Special Appeal 2013The past week has been traumatic for Egyptians. We witnessed bloodshed on our streets, vandalism and the deliberate destruction of churches and government buildings in lawless acts of revenge. One of our Anglican Churches was attacked, and other ministries received threats. We praise God that our churches and congregations are safe, but we grieve for the loss of life and for the churches which were burnt over the past week in Egypt.

The Anglican Church in Egypt serves all Egyptians, especially the disadvantaged and marginalized, through our educational, medical and community development ministries. We seek to be a light in our society, and we continue to serve our neighbours in the difficult situation which surrounds us. Unemployment is at a record high, there is a lack of security on the streets, the economy is in decline, and poverty is crushing for many people in Egypt.

We need your help

Through your support, we hope to help in the following areas:

  • Provide basic needs for the poorest of the poor (food, health care, children’s education).
  • Building the capacity of young adults in order to find work through vocational training and small business projects.
  • Spiritual ministry.

Helping the poorest of the poor

In many cases these are the most affected by the situation in Egypt. As the church, we want to practically show the love of God and provide for people in this challenging time in Egypt.

Some examples of ways that you could give are;

  • Provide a meal for a poor child ($1 US per day)
  • Visit to a doctor ($2 per visit)
  • Food to feed a family ($5 per day)
  • Subsidy for nursery fees for a child ($20 per month)
  • School fees for a year ($50 per year)
  • Emergency surgical operation ($100 per operation).

Building the capacity of young adults

It is very difficult for young people to find jobs, and the Diocese is empowering young adults (both hearing and deaf) through vocational training and micro-loans.

Examples of this are;

  • Vocational training for 2 months ($150)
  • Vocational training for 6 months  ($450)
  • Loan for a small business project  ($750)

Spiritual ministry

We continue to serve our congregations, and to teach the Word of God. You can;

  • Give a Bible ($3 per Bible)
  • Transport for children to attend Sunday School ($20 per session)
  • Subsidy to attend an Alpha Course ($20)

Please consider supporting us prayerfully and financially. If you would like to contribute financially, please give to one or more of the three categories above. If you send a non-designated donation then we will allocate the donation to the most needed category above.

May the Lord bless you!

+Mouneer


To make a donation

If you are in the US or  the  UK,  please  contact  our Partner Organisations

In Egypt or other countries, please contact the Diocese Partnership Office through Ms. Rosie Fyfe (rosie@dioceseofegypt.org)

If you would like to download a PDF version of the appeal: Special Appeal for Egypt (2013)

 

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