Memorials for Nelson Mandela

On Tuesday 10 December 2013, at the request of the Embassy of South Africa, services were held to remember former President Nelson Mandela.  Services were held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Algiers, Algeria and at the grounds of St. John the Baptist Church in Maadi, Egypt.  Algiers2Fr. Hamdy writes, “Yesterday, we had a great joy with people and Ambassador of South Africa, as we honored together late former President Nelson Mandela. I welcomed and thanked the attendants on behalf of  Bishop Dr. Mouneer Hanna Anis and Bishop Dr. Bill Musk.  The memorial service was attended by many Ambassadors, including the British Ambassador, the Vatican Ambassador and some Algerian government officials.

Algiers1Fr. Hamdy said, “We had good fellowship as we shared refreshments after service. I preached about the story of the Good Samaritan and how our Lord Jesus Christ was and is still calling us to love our neighbor without discrimination, helping the needy neighbor while disregarding his religion, nationality or the color of his skin.”

Maadi2The Rev. Chris Chorlton of All Saints Cathedral attended the service conducted on the grounds of St. John the Baptist Church in Maadi.  He brought words of condolences on behalf of Bishop Mouneer Hanna Anis and shared words of consolation expressed by The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.  Maadi1

The Rt. Rev. Dr. Bill Musk, Area Bishop for North Africa, also led prayers last Wednesday at the ecumenical Commemorative Service held in the Roman Catholic Cathedral in Tunis, in the presence of the President of the National Constituent Assembly (NCA) Mustapha Ben Jaafar, the Chargé d’Affaires of South Africa’s Embassy in Tunis, The Minister of Health Abellatif Mekki, The Roman Catholic Archbishop of Tunis, as well as other Ambassadors and religious leaders.  More information may be found here courtesy of Agence Tunis Afrique Presse.

111213_ben_jaafar_catedrale_catholique_mort_mandella_02

 

 

Christmas Services at All Saints Cathedral, Cairo

The Most Rev. Dr. Mouneer Hanna Anis, Bishop of the Episcopal / Anglican Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa, along with the clergy and congregations of All Saints Cathedral, Cairo, would like to invite you to their Christmas services and events.

  • Its A Wonderful Life (Saturday 14 December at 6pm)
  • A Broadway Christmas (Friday 20 December at 8pm)
  • Christingle children’s Service (Monday 23 December at 6pm)
  • Christmas Eve Service (Tuesday 24 December at 10:30pm)
  • Christmas Day Service (Wednesday 25 December at 10:30am)
  • New Year’s Eve Service (Tuesday 31 December at 10pm)

For more information, please contact Rev. Drew Schmotzer at chaplainegypt@gmail.com

All Saints Cathedral is located at 5 Michel Lutfallah Street, Zamalek, Cairo 11211 (behind the Marriott Hotel).

 

A Broadway Christmas

On Friday 20 December 2013, All Saints Cathedral will host “A Broadway Christmas” which will include musical highlights from Broadway shows like West Side Story, Phantom of the Opera, Chicago, The Sound of Music, Once, Mama Mia and My Fair Lady, as well as Christmas carols.   This event will be Directed by Ms. Dalia Farid Fadel and will feature Nesma Mahgoub, Hany Mustafa, Steven Labat, Therese Ananian, Rita Ashkar, Sherif Rizkallah, Nora Ghobrial, Hilary Baboukis, Marc Wakim, Amira Reda, Lily Farid, and introducing young talent Yousef Shabana.  Tickets will cost 50 LE and may be purchased at All Saints Cathedral.  All proceeds will go to support the education of disadvantaged preschool children.  The event is in cooperation with Global Strategic Consultants and Fabrica.  A Broadway Christmas (20 December 2013 at 8pm)

A new website for the Egypt Diocesan Association

The new website of the Egypt Diocesan Association

Click on the image above to visit the new EDA website

In 1889 the Revd Douglas M Thornton, a missionary from the Church Mission Society, was involved in establishing the Anglican Church in Egypt. Over 100 years later his great-grandson Douglas J Thornton, a committee member of the Egypt Diocesan Association (EDA), taught himself web design and set up the EDA website. Doug has been maintaining it ever since, but has decided  “it is about time to hand over our site to a professional”.

With the assistance of Small Beginnings, the EDA has a new website which includes

  • Some fascinating history of early evangelisation in Egypt, the Diocese, the Cathedral and much more
  • More images
  • Search facilities
  • Online membership application
  • Easy to read
  • Ability to browse on your PC, laptop or any mobile devices
  • Ability to subscribe to receive news and updates
  • Has all the links you need to stay in touch with the Diocese and its different ministries
  • Links with other useful websites.

The Diocese is extremely grateful for the work of the EDA, who support the churches and ministries across the Diocese through prayer, visits and financial support.

News from the Deaf Community in Egypt

Dear Friends, please find the link below with the news from the Deaf community in Egypt, including updates from the Church for the Deaf in Old Cairo, the Vocational Training Centre for the Disabled in 6 of October City, and the Deaf Unit in Old Cairo.  May the Lord bless the work of their hands!

November 2013 Deaf Unit and Church Newsletter -MN (1) – Copy

13 Years of Arabic Services at Christ the King Church in Tripoli

Yesterday, on 29 November 2013, the Arabic speaking congregation at Christ the King Church in Tripoli, Libya celebrated thirteen years of faithful ministry.  Several members of the congregation as well as the community brought congratulations in different languages, and the praise team of the church led the congregation in singing praises to God for His faithfulness.  Bishop Bill sent his congratulations, saying, “Many congratulations on your anniversary!  We praise God with you!” and Bishop Mouneer said, “May the Lord bless you and protect you! (الرب يبارككم و يحميكم).”  May God give Christ the King 100’s of more years!

Special thanks need to be given to The Most Rev. Dr. Mouneer Hanna Anis, Bishop of the Diocese of Egypt with North Africa and the Horn of Africa, whose vision it was to rebuild this congregation; to The Rt. Rev. Dr. Bill A. Musk, Area Bishop for North Africa, who has repeatedly visited and encouraged the congregation since becoming a bishop in October 2008; to the faithful members of the different congregations at Christ the King; and to the team of international ministers at Christ the King: Rev. Vasihar from India, Rev. Gus from Canada, Rev. Ayo from Nigeria and Rev. Samuel from Egypt.

We are changing how we publish our newsletters

With recent changes to our website, we have decided to change how we send out our regular Diocesan Newsletter.  In the past, we created a document (usually a PDF file) and then sent it out to a newsletter mailing list. Since the launch of the new diocese website, we have decided to distribute the Diocesan Newsletter as well as news items from other ministries around the diocese electronically.

The Diocesan Newsletter will continue to be published both on the website and to our email distribution list, but it will be in a web-based format not as a PDF. We hope that the new format will help you to share the newsletter with family, friends and colleagues more easily.

If you are not on the distribution list but would like to recieve our e-newsletters, please click the button below and sign-up.

Sign up to receive our e-newsletters

Making a PDF from the newsletter

(or any other news post or page in the website)

We know that many of our supporters like to print and share our newsletters. You can create PDFs to share with friends, family, colleagues and churches by….

First, go to the newsletter on the diocese website

Look down towards the bottom of the page and you will see a small button that has a little printer icon and a PDF icon on it

print-pdf-button

Click on this print/PDF button and you will be offered either to print the article/newsletter/post/page straight to your printer, or to create a PDF file and save it to your computer.

 

Visit of Rev Stephen Sizer to Holy Trinity Church, Algiers

Rev Hamdy Daoud, the priest-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church in Algiers, recently hosted Rev Stephen Sizer, and said “We enjoyed Rev Stephen preaching in our Church on Friday; he spoke about the future in the Christian theology and he gave us 7 irrefutable biblical points by which we stand firm against Christian Zionism claims. The church was very well attended, 110 people from 10 different nationalities.

During his visit, Rev Stephen was interviewed three times by Algerian Television and Radio programs, gave lectures for an Islamic institute in Algiers, and addressed Muslim leaders and scholars in the University of Oran. The lectures were on the topics of: the historical roots of Christian Zionism, the political agenda of Christian Zionism, and the Arab-Israeli Conflict from Christian Perspective.

All of the lectures were received very well. Rev Stephen could powerfully shake the theological foundation of Christian Zionism movement and helped Algerians Muslims (leaders and students) understand Christian Zionism. One of the Islamic Leaders thanked Rev Stephen for removing wrong illusions about Christians. All appreciated the call of Rev Stephen that justice has got to be achieved for Palestinians. All appreciated the Biblical call for peace, doing justice, loving mercy and walking humbly with God.”

We do thank God for supporting us by Rev Stephen to work with us last week. We do thank God for supporting us by Algerian officials; we do appreciate their support and we also do thank the interior ministry who escorted us in Oran!! Events like this in Algeria show that Christian community is important for the continuation of Muslim Christian dialogue and for the development of their society!

 

 

Definitely NOT boring! Reflections of Bishop Grant on Ministry in the Horn of Africa

Definitely NOT boring!  Just a couple of years ago, life was fairly predictable. Most days I could be found in my office, in front of my computer screen doing professorial preparation or in the classroom teaching. But now, a kaleidoscope of travel has kept life, well, let’s say ‘interesting’!

South Sudan: Speaking at the retreat for students graduating from Bishop Gwynne College and then at the graduation itself combined joy (finally a chance to go to the college where Wendy and I were to have gone almost 30 years ago but were prevented by war), and frustration (preaching at Emmanuel Jieng Church, the wonderful worship interrupted by an hour long campaign speech by the country’s Vice President as he ‘greeted’ the people).

Addis: learning Amharic; jumping through residency permit hoops; filling in at our English congregation while the rector was away; leading and preaching at the Remembrance Day service organized by the British Embassy with 40 ambassadors and their ‘Military Attaches’; introducing a famous Baptist preacher at the Sunday evening service at St Matthew’s.

During one of our trips to Addis, a couple of terrorists blew themselves up while trying to assemble a bomb that they had intended to detonate at a large football match between Ethiopia and Nigeria. The devastation would have been horrific. The country is now on heightened alert. Nothing boring about life here.

Gambella: Life has been no less varied. Reports, repairs, preparation, Area Assembly (like a church ‘Convention’ or ‘Synod’ for the Episcopal Area of the Horn of Africa), and of course, interruptions – the stuff of ministry here. Wonderful visitors from the Mothers’ Union (one from London, one from Juba, one from Addis) to train local literacy facilitators in how to teach the women in our Gambella churches how to read their own language; great visit from St Matthew’s Church representatives to the Area Assembly. Much less helpful visit from a (now) former priest (deposed for neglect of duty, deception, violence and threatening behaviour among other things). Not much that is ‘routine’ here either.

I have often told people that nothing is mediocre in Africa – it is either spectacularly wonderful or truly awful.  I recently read the Old Testament story of the spies going to check out Canaan. Most of them (10 out of 12) came back with the report, “The people were like giants; we seemed like grasshoppers next to them.” A couple of days after reading the passage, I realized that I had caught a case of that exotic disease, ‘grasshopper syndrome’. I was having a tough time trusting that God would give the resources (material and spiritual) that are needed for this work. The ‘cares and occupations’ were taking a toll. I began to long for that 9-5 routine at the desk and in the classroom. A bit of boredom sounded kind of nice. A series of people and events have helped. Bishop Mouneer in Egypt has provided great wisdom; countless encouraging emails seem to arrive just when I need them; and (of course!) Wendy is always there to pray and support. God is good – I may be a grasshopper, but our God sure isn’t.

 

Horn of Africa Area Assembly

200 clergy, lay leaders, Mothers Union representatives, congregations from the 70 churches in Gambella gathered at the Gambella Anglican Centre for two days of business, worship and teaching.

As our churches in Gambella are so remote and living conditions are hard,  it is difficult for clergy and lay people to come together. The annual Area Assembly is important because it brings leaders together, to pray together, learn together, and grow to understand each other better. Please see below Bishop Grant LeMarquand’s report for the meeting.

Bishop’s Charge Area Assembly 2013

As part of the Assembly, churches presented dramas of Biblical stories. The audience hushed as ‘Jesus’ walked in, resplendent in wig and re-purposed Mothers’ Union uniform. In quiet solemnity, the crowd followed Jesus, holding wounded heads bound in cloth, walking with shortened and twisted limbs, and otherwise looking generally woe-begone. With quiet majesty, Jesus healed all.  As all sat down, one of the disciples approached the Lord, clearly explaining in Opo that the crowd needed to eat. A regal gesture from Jesus sent him back to the crowd, where 5 small loaves and 2 real fish were produced in hushed reverence. As Jesus lifted the basket high in mute thanksgiving, the plastic bag under the loaves and fish was ripped away, revealing the hidden bounty of bread rolls underneath. Electrifyingly, the crowd leapt to their feet, their cries of joy erupting from the absolute silence like a foretaste of resurrection! As one man, they dove in a free for all scrum, loaves of bread flying everywhere, mouths full of laughter and food – real joy… and really funny!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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